Author UltraRunning Magazine

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Clare Gallagher and Brian Rusiecki win the 2016-2017 UltraRunning Race Series

Clare Gallagher and Brian Rusiecki have won the UltraRunning Race Series Overall Ranking for the 2016-2017. The Series applied a formula to score every ultra finisher at every ultra race in the 12 months ending April 30, 2017. Top scores for four races – one at each classic ultra distance – were added to tabulate every ultrarunner’s score. The talented and experienced Rusiecki and Gallagher took different paths to the top of the rankings.

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Muscle Injury Without a Cause?

How many times have you gone out for a long run, only to come back sore or injured for no obvious reason? You haven’t pulled a muscle or twisted an ankle, yet you get a feeling of pain the next morning that suggests you got hit by a truck?

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Anderson and Kostelnick named Most Notable FKT of the Year

“Anish” now holds the Overall Self-Supported (backpacker) records for the Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail, and the AZT. She stands alone (and ahead of all men too) in her specialty, with her AZT being two days faster than the Men’s Self-Supported FKT, and was on track to be the quickest AZT ever until Michael Versteeg set a quicker faster (Supported) time a few days previous. Anderson covered the 800 mile route in 19 days, 17 hours and 9 minutes.

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Walmsley and Monforte named #2 Most Notable FKT of the Year

The best ultrarunner in the US knocked this one out of the park and was recognized for it. Records have been kept on this uber-route for decades, recently including Anton Krupicka, Dave Mackey, and Dakota Jones, with Jim taking 25 minutes off Rob Krar’s 2013 time. In the process he blazed South-North Rim in 2:46 which is an FKT itself. Walmsely covered the 42.2 miles in 5:55:20.

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Hicks and Meltzer named #3 Most Notable FKT of the Year

The Sawatch Range in Colorado has 14 summits over 14,000’ high – somewhat lined up in a row, with few trails, continuous rough terrain, navigation challenges, and of course, serious vert. The cutoff time to ascend and descend all 14 is 60 hours. Meghan was the 17th finisher and first woman to tag all 14 peaks over the roughly 100-mile route in that time (Anna Frost and Missy Govney earlier had reached the 14th summit within that time but paused on top). Meghan’s effort was Supported and she completed it in 59 hours and 36 minutes.

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Pantilat and Johnston named #4 Most Notable FKT of the Year

The man who knows the Sierra’s better than anyone now has the FKT on both the John Muir Trail and the much harder and higher SHR, which roughly parallels it. This is its first “serious” effort, taking a huge three days off the previous time. This terrific route sees a tiny fraction of attention compared to the JMT, presumably because it requires much more navigation and ability to move efficiently on 3rd class terrain. Pantilat covered the 195-mile route Unsupported in 4 days, 16 hours, 21 minutes.

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Vaught and Elson named #5 Most Notable FKT of the Year

Joelle Vaught is a Boise, ID ultrarunner who has a special fondness for running trails with her dogs. The 42-year old Vaught has an extraordinary ultrarunning resume, with 63 ultras completed, and 28 wins – including many large high-profile races in the west, among them, the Way Too Cool 50K, the Lake Sonoma 50-miler and Waldo 100K.

Data
2016 Most Competitive Fields

Each year a few races attract a large number of elite runners. In this analysis, we have examined the races in which those who received votes for Runner of the Year competed. Giving the runners of the year 40 points, the runners-up 39 points, and so on, we have devised a system for determining which races had the most competitive fields.

Magazine Issues
UltraRunning Jan/Feb 2017

The ever-floating Jim Walmsley takes a moment to smile as he approaches the tape at the JFK 50-miler on November 19. Walmsley broke Max King’s course record by 13 minutes in the oldest ultra in North America. Photo: Geoff Baker

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Roy Pirrung Inducted into American Ultrarunning Hall of Fame

In 1980, at the age of 32, Roy Pirrung was 60 pounds overweight, smoked 2 packs of cigarettes a day, and was a self-described binge drinker. He decided to take up running to help change his lifestyle. Within a year he was 60 pounds lighter, tobacco and alcohol free, and ran his first marathon, in 3:16.

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