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UltraRunning April 2018

  • Hydration Vest Reviews
  • Orcas Island 100
  • What Is the Beast Coast?
  • The Long Shadow of Depression
  • Frozen Gnome
  • Dave Mackey’s Long Journey Back
  • The Nutella Doctrine

Featured
What Happens After Wildfires
I sit here writing as three of my favorite trail systems across Oregon are being devastated by wildfire. As a former wildland firefighter, I understand that what may seem like a catastrophe can actually benefit an ecosystem. But as a trail runner, I continue to struggle with the fact that the lush trails full of thick vegetation and old growth trees are being scorched and burned away.
Seconds Matter
Ultramarathon races take hours, days. What’s a few lost seconds, right? Wrong. Seconds really do matter. Let me share with you a little story that illustrates this point. The race wasn’t a traditional ultramarathon, but a multiday adventure race involving a variety of disciplines, which included running, mountain biking, paddling and rock climbing.
Riding the Hot Desert Wind
Ride the Wind is a desert race through and through with cactus, kangaroo mice, wadis, coyotes, painted rocks, lizards, one hundred percent exposure, and a UV index that could strip paint off the space shuttle. Even the cactus was dying out there.
Listen To Your Body — What You Hear Might Surprise You
My non-running friends often ask me what it feels like to run a 100-miler. They find it difficult to imagine. I find it difficult to describe. Oxymoronic phrases like “Everything hurts, but I love it!” create more confusion than they clear up. I’ve been struggling to find a better way to get the message across. I think I finally found one.
Living With an Ultrarunner It’s Not Always So Easy
Following are some conclusions I have drawn after being married to a running fanatic (Gary Johnson, who placed ninth in the 1991 Angeles Crest 100 Mile Run and who totaled 127 miles in the 1990 Megan’s 24 Hour Track Run among other feats of wonder) for five years, in the form of advice for the newly initiated who may not know what they’re in for.
Chili Loading — The Answer to an Ultrarunner’s Problems
Stop laughing, this is no joke! Where did I get this secret? Well, it’s a long story and it goes back many years. You see, the historical and legendary Kit Carson was a great ultramarathon runner. Kit first introduced the concept of chili loading to a small band of Indians and ultrarunning cowboys while he was participating in a half-marathon.
Joe Fejes Sets New American Six-Day Mileage Record
This May, after falling just short of the magical 600-mile mark last year in Anchorage, AK, Joe Fejes became the first modern-day American to break the 600-mile barrier in six days at the EMU World Trophy races in Hungary. Zane Holscher caught up with Joe and obtained the following feedback and insights on his huge accomplishment.
The 1,000 Mile Class of 2015
I had just started my 140th lap, which was the same number in miles during the third day of the 72 hour race at 3 Days at the Fair held at the Sussex County Fairgrounds in Augusta, New Jersey. The afternoon sun hovered in a cloudless sky as runners took cover in the shade. Some were still on the course braving the afternoon heat and I was one of them.
Born to Run 200 miles
“Seek and you will find.” Well I found what I was looking for, the fact that I knew I was going to be running day and night thrilled me. That’s all I wanted.
Pacing in a 100-Miler: A Nice Way to Spend the Night
What’s it like to run 100 miles? To get an idea without all the effort, consider pacing someone in a 100-mile race. There are real benefits — you can run comfortably at an easy pace, enjoy the people and the scenery, and have a good training run.
San Francisco 100 Mile: A Challenge By the Bay
The San Francisco 100 pits you against the elements of nature but at the same time reveals all Nature’s glory in the hills and coastlines of the Marin Headlands just across the Golden Gate Bridge from the “City by the Bay.” Tony Bennett might have left his heart in San Francisco, but the 100 milers left their blood, sweat and tears in Marin.
Meet Ben Murphy – a 2015 participant in Manitou’s Revenge
Manitou’s Revenge might the hardest 50 (technically it is 54) mile race in the United States. In 50 miles runners climb over 15,000 feet of hand over foot, rocky, root covered, wet mountains. The Catskill mountains of New York, not known for towering peaks but more for the soul crushing technicality is where this race calls home.
Case Study: Buckle Fever
Buckle fever, or chronic ego driven exhaustion (CEDE), has been known to cause premature DNF and extreme remorse. This case study is taken from the 2015 Western States Endurance Run.
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